Works > Plants

hello
acrylic on layered silks
16 x 15"
2021
Freeze
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
8.5 x 8 x 7”
2021
leaky
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
3.25 x 5.5 x 5.5”
2021
Growth II
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
6 x 3.5 x 4"
2021
offering
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
6 x 5 x 5"
2020
fleeting
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
7 x 6 x 6"
2020
embraced
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
8 x 6 x 5.75"
2020
winning
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
9 x 8 x 8"
2020
Away
18.5 x 22”
2021
parted
Acrylic and ink on layered silks
11 x 9.25"
2020
wet
acrylic and inks on layered silks
11 x 9"
2021
proud
acrylic on layered silks
11 x 9"
2020
tropical
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
6.5 x 5.5 x 5"
2020
love devils
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
5.5 x 5.5 x 5”
2021
expand
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
5.5 x 4.5 x 3”
2021
soft cover
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
9 x 7 x 6.5"
2020
Shelter
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
6.5 x 5 x 4.5”
2021
liana
Acrylic and inks on layered silks
10.5 x 10”
2021
even
acrylic and ink on layered silks
11.5 x 9.5
2021
protective
Acrylic and inks on layered silks
8.5 x 24”
2021
invasive
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
2.75 x 4.5 x 4.5”
2021
Speechless
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
6 x 4 x 4”
2021
robed
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
5 x 3 x 3"
2021
collect
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
5 x 3 x 3"
2021
Relaxed
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
2 x 3.5 x 3.25
2019
Precious
Clay, glaze and plant cremains
2020
optimist
Clay and glaze and the ash of plants used in this construction
5.5 x 3 x 3"
2018

Plants and humans

Plants. The foundation of life on our planet and the source of my earliest memory of wonder and delight. Who are they? How do they live? What are they thinking? And why are they so beautiful? Ridiculous questions, yes. Or not.

And humans. Full of grace, poetry and heroics. And weirdly also unbelievably shortsighted, stupid and destructive. We have probably always been that way, even millennia ago, when we were fumbling around in the dirt to find pigments and make vessels.

Mysteriously, we are connected. We are clearly not the same, but we share DNA. 

The paintings are partial portraits of plants taken while living, showing leaves or fruits or flowers as they join to the plant, turning, sometimes toward the sun. The physicality of the paint on silks allows me to build transient memories of the plants I've seen, moving and living.

The clay objects are built partly with plants I've collected while walking in my neighborhood in Seattle; and include structural shapes, such as vessels and rectangular stands, that reveal my human presence. Later, the plants burn off in the kiln, leaving an enclosed bit of plant ash, tiny sepulchers.

I feel that this work connects me to prehistorical peoples who also made art with pigments and clay, and especially to other, sometimes overlooked species.